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Crowns and Bridges

Crowns and Bridges are made easy at Dr. Roxas Dental office! With her 11 years of Pediatric Dentistry experience she provides a warm, caring and gentle touch while providing all dental work.
Call the office TODAY to schedule your appointment! 1-626-914-8418

CONSULTATION

Call the office TODAY to schedule your one on one Consultation! 1-626-914-8418

Dental Crown and Bridge Care

You shouldn’t feel any discomfort or sensitivity after a crown is placed. However, if your tooth has not had a root canal, it will still contain the nerve. You may therefore have some temporary sensitivity to cold. If you notice pain or sensitivity when you bite down, contact your dentist. Usually this means that the crown is too high. When you bite, you are hitting the crown first. The crown needs to be adjusted. This can be done easily.

You may notice a thin, dark line next to the gumline on your crowned tooth if you look very closely in the mirror, particularly if you have a PFM crown. This dark line is the metal of the crown showing through. This is not a concern unless it appears on your front teeth and is visible. An all-porcelain crown, with no metal base, may be required to replace this crown.

A crowned tooth is protected from decay, except for the gum line. Your dentist may prescribe a high-fluoride gel for you to use every night if you have a high risk of developing cavities. A crown does not protect against gum disease. You should continue to brush twice a day and floss daily.

Crowns, especially all-porcelain ones, can chip. This can sometimes be repaired in the mouth. Your dentist will etch the porcelain with a special agent and then bond a composite resin to it to fix the chip. Porcelain repairs often don’t last long. If there’s a lot of chipping, you may need a replacement crown.

If the crown does not fit well over the prepared tooth, it’s possible that the cement will wash out from under the crown. However, the crown may not fall out right away. Under these conditions, bacteria will leak in and cause decay. If your crown seems loose when you chew, or if you have an unusual odor around the tooth, discuss this with your dentist. Your dentist will check your crowns at your regular visits.

Crowns sometimes fall out. This can be caused by washed-out cement or an improper fit. If this happens, place the crown in a secure, zip-top plastic bag. Then bring it to your dentist. Most of the time a new crown needs to be made. The old crown can be used as a temporary crown.

If you are in no discomfort and your appearance is not affected, don’t try to put the crown back in place yourself. If you do need to put it back in your mouth, clean it well on the inside. Use a toothpick to loosen and remove any cement or debris that is stuck to the crown. A wet cotton swab can finish the cleaning. You can replace the crown temporarily using denture adhesive or temporary cement. This is sold in many pharmacies. Contact your dental office right away and try to schedule a visit for the next day.